Your Exec

MEMSA Chair – Kate Marlow

The Chair is responsible for overseeing the organisation of MEMSA through delegating to the Exec and liaising with IMEMS. The Chair also organizes the fortnightly Seminar Series, and is available for general chats with all MEMSA members!

About Me

I’m Kate, I’m in the first year of my PhD in Medieval History and I’m studying the formation of ethnic identity in Anglo-Saxon England and Medieval Iceland. I love heroic and saga literature, the more fantastical the better, and Beowulf holds a special place in my heart. I did English literature in my undergrad and I like to use a range of sources for my studies, including written literary and historical sources and material culture, so whatever your discipline, I’m interested. I joined MEMSA last year during my MA and couldn’t resist getting more involved this year.

Favourite thing about MEMSA

I love that MEMSA allows us to meet and socialise with people in different areas and faculties in both academic and social settings. It can be difficult for postgraduates to meet people outside of their immediate specialism and MEMSA draws in people from all disciplines within the Medieval and Early Modern periods.

Speak to me about

Anything you fancy. I organise the MEMSA seminars and events so if you have any questions or comments about those or want to get involved then I’d love to hear from you, but I’m happy to discuss any aspect of MEMSA or just have a chat about how life’s going.

Contact

katharine.h.marlow@durham.ac.uk

 

Secretary – Tom Kearns

The Secretary is responsible for administration of exec business, minuting meetings, and co-ordinating social events. The Secretary works closely with the Press Secretary to develop programmes and term cards for the fortnightly seminar series.

About Me

I’m Tom, a second-year PhD student in the History Department. My research is focused on the anonymous Old English homilies of the Blickling and Vercelli Books as sources for monastic reform in tenth-century England. I completed my undergraduate degree in Anglo-Saxon, Norse, and Celtic at Cambridge and my masters in Theology (Ecclesiastical History) at Oxford.

Favourite thing about MEMSA

The friendly and enlightening atmosphere. It’s always great to know that you’ll find out about something you’d never even thought of before whenever you come to a MEMSA seminar bit it’s also good to know that MEMSA is a place you can always feel welcome too.

Speak to me about

Officially, presenting a paper at our seminars, social events and overall MEMSA administration, but I’m always happy to discuss anything people are concerned about.

Contact

thomas.r.kearns@durham.ac.uk

 

Treasurer – Ryan Wicklund

The treasurer is responsible for overseeing the society’s finances, liaising with IMEMS about the budget, obtaining funding, allocating money for the conference, socials and speakers.

About Me

I mainly work on agriculture, society, and the economy in County Durham during the late middle ages. I promise, it’s a lot more interesting than it sounds. People actually stayed awake during the MEMSA talk I gave – grain yields can really be interesting! Other than that, I do a bit of work indexing primary sources for local historians and genealogists. And I’m Treasurer for MEMSA this year.

Favourite thing about MEMSA

Well, the occasional human interaction is kind of nice. I also enjoy the seminars from people who work with different aspects of the medieval and early modern period. It can really help to put a different perspective on my own work.

Speak to me about

Attempting to change the biscuit selection at the MEMSA seminars. You can try to get money, too, but you’ve a better chance getting blood from a stone. You can also talk to me about medieval agriculture.

Contact

ryan.k.wicklund@durham.ac.uk

 

Press Officer – Abigail Steed

The Press Officer is responsible for promoting and advertising seminars and socials for MEMSA, as well as maintaining the society’s online presence.

About Me

I’m Abi. I’m a third year PhD student in the History Department. Bede and Cuthbert are soft spots of mine so Durham is a particularly wonderful place to be. Cuthbert especially slots in pretty well to my work on theological and social ideas about vengeance in late Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Norman society. I’ve been involved with MEMSA for the last couple of years as one of the conference organisers and journal editors, and just couldn’t stay away!

Favourite thing about MEMSA

The social element. As fantastic as it is to hear about the huge variety of work that everyone in MEMSA does, the society also creates a wonderful network of friends.

Speak to me about

Pretty much anything medieval related, the odder the better. If you know any particularly good vengeance miracle stories I’m all ears! More practically, anything to do with MEMSA’s advertising and social media.

Contact

a.f.g.steed@durham.ac.uk

 

Conference Chairs – Hannah Piercy and James Cronin

 The Conference Chair is in charge of organising the annual MEMSA conference. Our next conference, the eleventh, will be in July 2017, on the theme ‘Imitation and Innovation: Uses of the Past in the Medieval and Early Modern Worlds’. 

Hannah Piercy: 

About Me

Hi, I’m Hannah! I’m in the second year of a PhD in English Studies, looking at representations of female desire in medieval romance. As a Northerner and Cumbrian at heart, I have a particular interest in Arthurian texts, and tend to get very excited when they mention a familiar place-name! However, I also often find myself writing or wondering about clothing, ecocriticism, and animal studies – I’m always open to new research interests, so whatever you study, I’d love to hear about it! I joined MEMSA during my MA year in Durham, was last year’s Chair, and loved it so much that I decided I wanted to stay involved in my second year of PhD studies.

Favourite things about MEMSA

It’s honestly so difficult to choose just one thing, but I guess I’d have to say the mix of people and research interests MEMSA brings together in a friendly and relaxed environment. The interdisciplinary mix and chronological range of our members’ research interests is really important to me, and it’s fantastic to be able to discuss research with people approaching a topic or period from a very different angle. But while we’re wide-ranging in our academic outlook, MEMSA also has a strong community feel. There is lots of support and friendship as well as academic stimulation and discussion on offer!

Speak to me about

Absolutely anything! Although more particularly, I’d love to hear your thoughts, questions, concerns, or feedback about the MEMSA Conference. If you’d like to present next summer, or even if you are just thinking about the possibility of doing so, come and find me for a chat! I’d love to talk to you more about MEMSA, tea, and biscuits. Or cats. Preferably cats.


James Cronin: 

About Me

Greetings! I am JAMES, a PhD student in the Department of History! My research focuses on the manuscripts produced by the monks of Durham in the fifteenth century, but I am also more generally interested in the religious history of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries! This year I will be organising the MEMSA conference along with Hannah and it will probably be the best conference ever!!!!

Favourite things about MEMSA

Free biscuits, talking to human people, occasional free wine.

Speak to me about

Bawdy medieval jokes, fifteenth/sixteenth century religious history, late medieval manuscripts and palaeography.

Do not talk to be about

Anglo-Saxons, anything that happened after the Council of Trent.

Contact

j.d.cronin@durham.ac.uk

 

Outreach Officer – Kimberley Foy

The Outreach Officer is chiefly responsible for convening the MEMSA ‘Community Course’, which will be held during the spring and summer. My aims are to engage widely with interested people beyond the university, and broaden the outreach of MEMSA to those in the local area.

About Me

I spend much of my time wondering why my cat ignores me when I happen to see her on the street near my house. When I’m not doing that, I’m just a regular PhD student, looking at the relationship between dress and diplomatic practice at the seventeenth-century English court. I’m based in the history department but am also a member of CVAC (Centre for Visual Arts and Culture). I think Outreach is as important as any other role that MEMSA fulfils in the University. I know I would say that as Outreach Officer but it is vitally important that we invite local people to engage with their own love of learning as we are lucky enough to do.

Favourite thing about MEMSA

The first MEMSA talk I attended was all about strange things coming out of early modern vaginas. It is not an exaggeration to say that interacting with those from other fields will open up a whole new world, so to speak. If the talk fails to impress, MEMSA drinks and other socials are a great way to socialise yourself.

Speak to me about

What an absolute fail my cat is. Visual culture and the importance non-verbal communication. 90s girl rock bands. Most importantly, any ideas on how to involve the local community or offers of help to organise the outreach programme. 

Contact

kimberley.foy@durham.ac.uk

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